“Enemies Are Just Two People Suffering” – KD

DOING WHAT YOU WANT WHILE CULTIVATING COMPASSION

Do what you want! At first glance, that seems like a simple enough piece of advice however when put into practice, it can get to be rather confusing and at times even painful. A spiritual teacher of mine recently shared a story where he was told this by his guru: “Do what you want”. Last weekend I was lucky enough to attend a workshop with Krishna Das where we discussed many things including suffering, equanimity, and compassion. Many of us shared what it means for us to live with an open heart, how we cultivate our spiritual practice and what the implications are of, “doing what you want.”

I left the workshop feeling cleansed of personal gunk and full of something else I couldnt really articulate. There were so many different topics bouncing around the room yet everything flowed so nicely into each other that the 3 hours gently melted away. When the day came to a close, I got in my car and drove into the mountains; I felt a sense of urgency to connect the dots in my sometimes overly intellectual mind. I felt a bit like a pin ball zig zagging around;  bouncing between just sitting and being with the experience while also feeling the drive to logically solve the puzzle of how it is all connected.

In any case, I have done a little of both, because after all, that is what I want to do. What struck me more than anything from that afternoon are two statements I have already touched upon – “Do what you want” – which is what Krishna Das was told by his guru when he was seeking advice about what to do when he returned to the USA after years of living as a devotee in India. The other statement that made an impact is something that Krishna Das said very casually, “Enemies are just two people suffering.” I have been sitting with these two thoughts for about a week now getting a sense of their connection and what it means to me.

In terms of relationships of any kind; enemies are born out of a lack of compassion and an abundance of confusion, often a result of two people trying to get what they want in very different ways. People feel compelled to say and do certain things when what they want is not in alignment with what they feel they are getting. When actions to get what one wants come from a place of suffering; confusion, dysfunction and hurt ensues. Often times, people are coming from this place not to be malicious, but as a side effect of a lack of self-awareness. As an example, “I feel hurt and therefore I will hurt you”, however, it is rarely comes from that level of awareness. Even better and more often the inner dialogue goes as such, “I am suffering, I will hurt myself more. “ And again, it is very rare that those thoughts are in the forefront of one’s awareness.

Alternatively, cultivating a sense of compassion and meeting people and yourself in that in that space can begin to end the spiral of suffering. Cultivating compassion does not mean you have to agree with someone or like how they are operating in their lives, not being enemies does not mean you need to be friends and to love there is no prerequisite to like. Cultivating a sense of compassion in how you approach the world can look as simple this “I see that you are trying to manifest what you want in the only way you know how, right now, I am doing it a different way.” As it so often goes, this is clearly much simpler in words than it is in action.

I want to share a practice that I discovered a few years ago that helps me meet people in a place of compassion rather than a place a judgment, hurt or resentment, it is from “The Compassion Project”. It is gentle reminder that everyone is doing things in the only way they know how and we are all essentially seeking out the same things; love, peace, contentment and the felt sense of being seen (just to name a few). Please take a moment to read just a bit further and see if this could be useful in your life.

Objective: To increase the amount of compassion in the world.

Expected Result: A personal sense of peace.

Instructions -This exercise can be done anywhere that people congregate (airports, malls, parks, beaches, etc.). It should be done on strangers, unobtrusively, from some distance. Try to do all five steps on the same person.

Step 1 – With attention on the person, repeat to yourself: “Just like me, this person is seeking some happiness for his/her life.”

Step 2 – With attention on the person, repeat to yourself: “Just like me, this person is trying to avoid suffering in his/her life.”

Step 3 – With attention on the person, repeat to yourself: “Just like me, this person has known sadness, loneliness, and despair.”

Step 4 – With attention on the person, repeat to yourself: “Just like me, this person is seeking to fulfill his/her needs.”

Step 5 – With attention on the person, repeat to yourself: “Just like me, this person is learning about life.”

Variation:

  1. To be done by couples and family members to increase understanding of each other.
  2. To be done on old enemies and antagonists still present in your memories.
  3. To be done on other life forms.

 

For more information on Jessica and her healing practice in Canandaigua NY, please visit her website @ www.sacredpathwaysguidancecenter.com or call 585-935-1917

Related Articles, Video’s and Links

http://www.goodnewsnetwork.org/touching-wwi-themed-christmas-ad-reenacts-truce-1914/

http://www.krishnadas.com/

http://www.jackkornfield.com/meditation-on-compassion/

http://www.theavatarcourse.com/en/the-compassion-project.html

 

Dia De Los Muertos – A Celebration of Love and Life

The day which we fear as our last is but the birthday of eternity. ~ Seneca

Naturally, death is often experienced as a painful occasion and the loss of a loved one is frequently a life altering event. In my own life, my family and I experienced a period of time where death came to visit us far too often. With the many deaths, an invisible line was drawn in the sand of our family history; a line that indicated crossing over from our lives before that loss into our lives after that loss. Each time I received the news of someone’s passing it felt as if I was being pulled underwater into the ocean, wave after wave hitting me and no matter how hard I tried, I was not given enough time to come back up for air.

These experiences of death in my own life are part of the reason that I invested my time in studying to be a counselor and to focus a great deal of my energy on the experience of grief trauma and loss. I feel that this calling sought me out; I certainly would not have gone running to immerse myself in the experience death on my own volition. As it often happens, the greatest teachers in life find you and death, as much as some of us try to fight it, is a powerful teacher to us all. As one of Elizabeth Kubler Ross’s first teachers told her, “Death is an old friend of mine.”

Through my grieving process, as I was able to come up for air, I discovered a new appreciation for life and for the challenges that I had faced. One of the discoveries in my process of unearthing the gifts in the pain is the tradition in Mexico called Dia de los Muertos or Day of the Dead. I remember learning about this holiday and feeling so empowered and spoken to. Death is an inevitable part of life and rather than place that experience in the shadows and make it a topic people are deeply afraid to address, people in Mexico take two days and celebrate those they have lost to the fullest.

Dia De Los Muertos begins November 1st by celebrating the young that have passed on and continues through November 2nd where the lives of the adults are celebrated. People who celebrate this day create beautiful alters adorned with brightly colored marigolds and pictures of the deceased. The belief is that in these two days, those that have crossed over are able to come back and once again visit with their loved ones. Colorful alters are created; candy, water, spirits and bread are set out for the dead to replenish themselves after their long journey home. These items are also rich in symbolism. Often times you will see colorful skulls made of sugar as a representation of those loved ones who have died. The enticing smells of incense and marigolds leave a path for the deceased to follow back to this world.

In more traditional towns, you will find celebrations in the cemeteries where people will camp out by the head stones, play music and revel in these two days where all can have a felt sense of their loved ones being present with them again. You will not hear wails of sorrow or see tears of sadness; what you will experience is a profound sense that life, not death is being celebrated and for two days, those that have been lost are with us again.

For me, this celebration in itself has been a gift; On November 1st I will be making pan de muerto, putting out my sugar skulls, going through old photos and greeting my many loved ones that have passed on. I will acknowledge and trust the deep sense I have that they are still with me and I will continue keep their memory alive by celebrating their life rather than ruminating on their death. Above all, I will be celebrating love; love of my family and friends and my love of this wildly complex yet wonderfully simple life I have been given.

For more information on Jessica and her practice in Canandaigua, go to http://www.sacredpathwaysguidancecenter.com or call 585-935-1917

For more information on this holiday, follow these links:

http://www.inside-mexico.com/featuredead.htm

http://www.celebrate-day-of-the-dead.com/day-of-the-dead-facts.html

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2014/10/29/359829045/decoding-the-food-and-drink-on-a-day-of-the-dead-altar

 

The Current Ebola Crisis – Our Collective Consciousness and Learning to Let Go

“Let go of the battle. Breathe quietly and let it be. Let your body relax and your heart soften. Open to whatever you experience without fighting.”

― Jack Kornfield, A Path with Heart: A Guide Through the Perils and Promises of Spiritual Life

Let’s consider the possibility that the fear and frenzy that has been raised over the spread of Ebola could actually be more damaging to our health than the threat of Ebola itself. Right now in the media and our collective consciousness there seems to be a predominate sense of angst, anxiety, fear and catastrophic thinking. I have already touched upon this in one of the last articles I wrote and perhaps I am being a bit redundant however the expression of fear in our culture is becoming amplified and seems worthy of further and perhaps deeper exploration.

I can only speak from my experience and what I am seeing is a vortex of fear that is pulling people in. The more people that get pulled in, the more consuming the vortex becomes and with each person consumed the stronger the vortex gets. What I am really talking about is the power of our collective consciousness.It works like a tornado; the bigger it gets, the more it consumes and the more powerful it becomes.

“Collective Consciousness”; neat words to say together but what do they mean?

Collective consciousness can be defined in many different ways, in this case it can be thought of as the awareness of a whole community existing alongside the lives of ourselves as individuals; keeping in mind that each one is simultaneously affecting the other. It can be seen as a shared framework of our experience that we are all collaborating on, perhaps without an individual awareness that we are in the process of co-creation. In this case, it is about how we are all collectively affecting each-others well-being by being transfixed on a worst case scenario.

It appears the fear that has been building on the spread of this illness has a couple different elements; a fear of death (a topic worthy of its own blog), and a fear of something becoming out of control or being beyond our control. The more we try to grasp for control, the slipperier it becomes and the greater the frenzied behavior. While we focus on the potential outcome of disease spreading, and try to avoid that outcome, we are creating a situation where what we fear becomes an actuality, DIS-ease is actually spreading. Our focus and obsession with not becoming ill is collectively making us ill.

As an alternative to the panic and to still honor the fear that many are feeling, what if we sat back, took a breath, a few moments or our time and said, “Wow, this could turn into scary situation, I am fearful of this spreading.” Then, what would happen if we just let that be? What if we let ourselves have that experience and not fight against it? Can we focus on the present experience of fear yet not spiral out of control into a catastrophic imagined future often based on irrational thinking and erratic feeling. Is it possible to let yourself feel the fear, yet not be consumed by it?

Being able to do this would not only be an act of care and compassion for ourselves but also our communities collective consciousness. With each person that stops where they are, takes a breath and steps away from the frenzy -the less powerful the vortex of fear becomes. Not only does the fear vortex become weak but a new energy pattern is created.

Imagine that the room you are currently in is filled with people running around chaotically, out of breath, in a panic, exhausted, looking for something they don’t know isn’t even there. Now imagine that same room with all that dis-ease and chaos – picture a person amidst all the panic, calmly walking into the middle of the room, sitting down, recognizing the chaos that is going on around them and then taking a deep breath in and a purposeful exhale out. What do you think would happen to that room? I believe that others would join and the whole emotional climate of the room would change.

It is so easy to get caught up in the feeding frenzy of catastrophic thinking and in fears of the future. I often find myself running around my house, spinning myself and my families collective consciousness into a heighten state of stress because the floor is not mopped or our budget is blown for the week or my sons clothes aren’t where I want them. I am creating chaos because I fear that if the floor isn’t clean, there will be chaos? That makes no sense but I believe at some point we all catch ourselves in this trap. On a global scale it is the fear of Ebola – creating illness by trying so hard to prevent it.

In my life, as admittedly trivial it is, it is the panic about the dog hair on the floor that affects not only me but my very local community; my family. What I need to remember is to stop, to honor my experience and just let it be. Not to fight it because in fighting it I am just creating the situation I am trying to avoid, I think there is there is a lesson in this for all of us. Instead of STOP DROP and ROLL for fire safety, we can do our own first response for the personal fires that we walk through everday. We can use this as a daily practice in staying present and letting go of the battle; STOP what we are doing, DROP into our experience and ROLL with the punches. Give that a try for a few days and tell me what you think!

For more information on Jessica and her practice in Canandaigua please go to http://www.sacredpathwaysguidancecenter.com

Suggested Reading

http://www.jackkornfield.com/
http://www.jackkornfield.com/equanimity-vs-indifference/

The Current Ebola Crisis – Our Collective Consciousness and Learning to Let Go

“Let go of the battle. Breathe quietly and let it be. Let your body relax and your heart soften. Open to whatever you experience without fighting.”

― Jack Kornfield, A Path with Heart: A Guide Through the Perils and Promises of Spiritual Life

Let’s consider the possibility that the fear and frenzy that has been raised over the spread of Ebola could actually be more damaging to our health than the threat of Ebola itself. Right now in the media and our collective consciousness there seems to be a predominate sense of angst, anxiety, fear and catastrophic thinking. I have already touched upon this in one of the last articles I wrote and perhaps I am being a bit redundant however the expression of fear in our culture is becoming amplified and seems worthy of further and perhaps deeper exploration.

I can only speak from my experience and what I am seeing is a vortex of fear that is pulling people in. The more people that get pulled in, the more consuming the vortex becomes and with each person consumed the stronger the vortex gets. What I am really talking about is the power of our collective consciousness.It works like a tornado; the bigger it gets, the more it consumes and the more powerful it becomes.

“Collective Consciousness”; neat words to say together but what do they mean?

Collective consciousness can be defined in many different ways, in this case it can be thought of as the awareness of a whole community existing alongside the lives of ourselves as individuals; keeping in mind that each one is simultaneously affecting the other. It can be seen as a shared framework of our experience that we are all collaborating on, perhaps without an individual awareness that we are in the process of co-creation. In this case, it is about how we are all collectively affecting each-others well-being by being transfixed on a worst case scenario.

It appears the fear that has been building on the spread of this illness has a couple different elements; a fear of death (a topic worthy of its own blog), and a fear of something becoming out of control or being beyond our control. The more we try to grasp for control, the slipperier it becomes and the greater the frenzied behavior. While we focus on the potential outcome of disease spreading, and try to avoid that outcome, we are creating a situation where what we fear becomes an actuality, DIS-ease is actually spreading. Our focus and obsession with not becoming ill is collectively making us ill.

As an alternative to the panic and to still honor the fear that many are feeling, what if we sat back, took a breath, a few moments or our time and said, “Wow, this could turn into scary situation, I am fearful of this spreading.” Then, what would happen if we just let that be? What if we let ourselves have that experience and not fight against it? Can we focus on the present experience of fear yet not spiral out of control into a catastrophic imagined future often based on irrational thinking and erratic feeling. Is it possible to let yourself feel the fear, yet not be consumed by it?

Being able to do this would not only be an act of care and compassion for ourselves but also our communities collective consciousness. With each person that stops where they are, takes a breath and steps away from the frenzy -the less powerful the vortex of fear becomes. Not only does the fear vortex become weak but a new energy pattern is created.

Imagine that the room you are currently in is filled with people running around chaotically, out of breath, in a panic, exhausted, looking for something they don’t know isn’t even there. Now imagine that same room with all that dis-ease and chaos – picture a person amidst all the panic, calmly walking into the middle of the room, sitting down, recognizing the chaos that is going on around them and then taking a deep breath in and a purposeful exhale out. What do you think would happen to that room? I believe that others would join and the whole emotional climate of the room would change.

It is so easy to get caught up in the feeding frenzy of catastrophic thinking and in fears of the future. I often find myself running around my house, spinning myself and my families collective consciousness into a heighten state of stress because the floor is not mopped or our budget is blown for the week or my sons clothes aren’t where I want them. I am creating chaos because I fear that if the floor isn’t clean, there will be chaos? That makes no sense but I believe at some point we all catch ourselves in this trap. On a global scale it is the fear of Ebola – creating illness by trying so hard to prevent it.

In my life, as admittedly trivial it is, it is the panic about the dog hair on the floor that affects not only me but my very local community; my family. What I need to remember is to stop, to honor my experience and just let it be. Not to fight it because in fighting it I am just creating the situation I am trying to avoid, I think there is there is a lesson in this for all of us. Instead of STOP DROP and ROLL for fire safety, we can do our own first response for the personal fires that we walk through everday. We can use this as a daily practice in staying present and letting go of the battle; STOP what we are doing, DROP into our experience and ROLL with the punches. Give that a try for a few days and tell me what you think!

For more information on Jessica and her practice in Canandaigua please go to http://www.sacredpathwaysguidancecenter.com

Suggested Reading

http://www.jackkornfield.com/
http://www.jackkornfield.com/equanimity-vs-indifference/

Dying with Dignity – A Call to Save Serenity House

“Watching a peaceful death of a human being reminds us of a falling star; one of a million lights in a vast sky that flares up for a brief moment only to disappear into the endless night forever.”

Elisabeth Kubler-Ross

 In 2000, when I was 17 years old, my grandmother who had lived with my family for 10 years died after a lengthy stay in the hospital.  My grandmother had a bad fall one day at home and from there her health quickly deteriorated. At the time, my family did not know what options were available. My grandmother was 90 years old; we knew her health was declining along with her time with us here on earth. My parents knew that they did not have the capability to take care of her in our home due to lack of medical equipment and in home medical care. My family made the difficult decision to have my grandmother stay in a continuing care/hospital type setting. Everyone in my family did what they could, visiting my grandmother often, showing her the love and support she had always given so many others. Ultimately, my grandmother died in the hospital, surrounded by those she loved and thankfully she had a peaceful departure from this world.

During her stay, despite our best efforts, situations unfolded that left us all with a feeling that made us crave a better environment for her at the end of her journey.  It was also not just her; during her stay at the hospital, my sister, mother and I would make a point to visit other patients who were all quite ill. These patients were also saying their last, often slow goodbyes to a world that left them in their passing with very little support; placing them in a metaphorical closet, as a result of a culture that avoids the topic of death and often rejects the experience of dying.  Often times we would need to alert the staff that they needed assistance; to be moved over a bit, needed more blankets, new sheets etc. In addition, what these people needed were open hearts and caring souls. The patients we visited always seemed really grateful of these moments that my family would spend with them.  In those moments, they had advocates in the form of strangers who cared deeply about their well-being and wanted their care to be on par with what my grandmother was receiving. My grandmother got such great care, no doubt in response to my mother’s diligence and refusal to accept any sign carelessness or negligence towards my grandmother. What I watched my mother experience was a mentally, emotionally and spiritually exhausting process.

After my Grandmothers death, a deep grief came to my family, especially my mother. It was in this grief for my grandmother, for the other patients, for the state of our culture and the treatment of the elderly and dying that my mother discovered a gift in our community. This discovery ended up being as much of a gift to her as it has been to the hundreds of people who have been able to experience their last moments there.  The gift I am referring to is Serenity House. Serenity House is a place that provides free care for the dying and their families. People are able to experience death here in a way that many others are not.

What my mother discovered when she found Serenity House was love, support, compassion, authenticity and openness to an experience that one day we will all face. Instead of fear in the face of death, she found love; instead of limitations she found freedom, and where there could have been a feeling of emptiness there was an awe-inspiring experience of abundance. Serenity House has been providing a truly priceless place not just for dying but more importantly, a place for living. Those that stay at Serenity House are able to live each moment up to their last and hopefully one day, when we each meet our moment of passing; we too will be so lucky to be enveloped with the kind of love, acceptance and support that Serenity House provides.

Many of you are unaware that Serenity House is currently in jeopardy. Just as they provide unconditional care and support for our community members in a time of need, they too are now in a time of need. Serenity House needs funds in order to keep their doors open. For years, Serenity House has held a space in our community that is too big and too heavy for each of us to hold individually. We now have the power as individuals and as a community to assist them in the timeless and meaningful work that they do.  Serenity House is a place that has transformed grief into a gift and now needs that same level of transformative generosity to help them continue.

Not many communities are lucky enough to have people and a place that will help them say goodbye; let’s not put our community in the position where we are saying goodbye and closing the doors to the same resource who has always helped us through it.

Please donate to: http://www.youcaring.com/nonprofits/dying-with-dignity-keep-the-lights-on-at-serenity-house-/234889?

Living in Fear-Taking a Breath and Finding Compassion Amidst the Panic.

“Compassion has enemies, and those enemies are things like pity, moral outrage, fear.” Joan Halifax

I sit here looking out the window at this morning’s sunrise; the colors of fire washing across the sky. A new day begins with yesterday’s negativities being burned up by the rising of the sun. I sometimes like to imagine this on a grand scale; that each and every morning, with the rising of the sun, a tiny bit of this world’s karma gets burned up, opening up more space each day for all of us to breathe, heal and live in compassion.

It appears from watching the news and listening to people that the level of fear in the collective consciousness seems to be at an all-time high. A headline yesterday on CCN read – “The Great American Freak-out – a time and space where the whole country seems to be infused with, and contributing to an overriding sense of fear of terrorism”. As I watched the news last night, it consisted of, death, disease and a general sense of impending doom.

I have been speaking with a lot of people recently who are unable to pull themselves away from war and terror; watching it on TV, reading about it in the papers, creating it in their own lives and constantly experiencing in in their minds. Many people are living enveloped in the headlines with the omnipresent sense that disaster is lurking around every corner.

When we spend all of our time focused on the external world, we tend to lose sight of what is happening within us, even though each one is affecting the other simultaneously. Living with perpetual anxiety is damaging to our spiritual, mental and emotional well- being for a multitude of reasons. Fear, as it is rooted in the future, prevents us from living in the present moment which dulls our quality of life. Often, our decision making is radically different when we come from a place of fear versus of place of contentment. In addition, when we are in a heightened state of anxiety, we are physically unable to access the full capabilities of our brain making us incapable of using our creative problem solving abilities to their fullest. Most concerning, when we are operating from a place of fear, it is difficult if not impossible to be in a place of compassion. Without compassion for ourselves or others there is no room for healing and so a vicious cycle begins and continues.

Some people are living in such a constant state of anxiety that feelings indicating fear are not even within the reach of our conscious minds.For example, if you live by the thruway long enough, eventually the loud noises of cars and trucks continuously whishing by is no longer something that you are aware of. Likewise, when you are in a perpetual state of fear or even living surround by it, the internal effects of it eventually become unnoticeable.

So today, after you watch the six o’clock news, try to become aware of your experience. Take a moment; breathe…notice and focus on your breath. If you are able to, notice what is happening in your body; your stomach, neck or shoulders? What emotions are coming forward? Are you angry, sad, confused, disappointed, or anxious? Watch what is trying to rise to the surface – be a witness to it and let it go. Listen to your internal headlines, move forward accordingly and begin finding compassion for yourself and all that you have been holding onto. It is only when we slow down, breathe and welcome some unsavory emotions into our awareness that we are able to let them go. By doing so, we open a space within ourselves where compassion can reside and a sense of peace can flourish. Try to take a break from the fear and breath.

For further information on Jessica and her practice in Canandaigua NY, please visit, http://www.sacredpathwaysguidancecenter.com

Further Reading – http://www.onbeing.org/blog/encountering-grief-guided-meditation/4983

“Mindfulness, Compassion & Wisdom: Three Means To Peace” by Joseph Goldstein – http://www.pbs.org/thebuddha/blog/2010/may/11/mindfulness-compassion-wisdom-three-means-peace-jo/

Video – http://mountainsangha.org/how-to-train-compassion/

The NFL, Domestic Violence, and Self Awareness

“I help people as a work on myself and I work on myself to help people.” – Ram Dass

As most of us know, last month the behavior of multiple NFL players had been making headlines and a debate has ensued over the standards set for player’s personal conduct. While this might be “old news” the core of the conversation is something that warrants discussion. So far, much of this conversation has to do with a “who did what when?” type of finger pointing and reasonably so. It appears that over the course of the past 14 years there have been 87 arrests involving 80 players for domestic violence charges. What many people have had contention with are the inconsistences or lack of consequences these players have had to face. All of this is well and good conversation however how we are treating this topic in the media is no different than how we often treat this topic in our own personal lives, dancing on the edge of the conversation without taking a look within it.

While these players’ actions have been deplorable at best, they have potentially brought to light a topic that all too often is only whispered about and left to be discussed behind closes doors, just as the crime itself is experienced. I am not discounting public awareness campaigns and the hard work of amazing organizations and individuals that provide advocacy, however, when it is our sister, brother, mother, nephew, friend or cousin, all too often we do not know what to say or do or how to feel. What is going on that this topic is often treated as the victims themselves are?

Often times, due to a lack of self-awareness, dangerous judgments have a tendency to sneak their way into our minds and conversations. Judgments that sound like, ‘How does s/he stand for that?’ “I would be out of there’ “I would never let anyone treat me like that” and “I can’t believe s/he went back to them.”

Talking about domestic violence requires on some level that we address the ways in which we all have experienced violence. The topic brings up a deep emotional reaction for many people and for many reasons. In order to authentically discuss this topic and be available for others going through such an experience, there are certain things we are asked to face either consciously or unconsciously about ourselves. How have we personally experienced violence? And let’s not forget, violence comes in many different forms and can come not only from others but also ourselves. Often the most taboo subjects are taboo because we do not want to face that part of ourselves or our own lives.

I am not asking you to take a head first dive all by yourself into the deep end of your shadow self or trauma history. That is a potentially dangerous act without the help of a professional, whether that is a therapist or spiritual guide/mentor. However, I am suggesting that perhaps we all begin thinking about the idea that as we work on our own personal development and healing, how much more available we become to others. Perhaps what I am suggesting is a radical change in consciousness in how we approach violence and specifically domestic violence. That change in consciousness begins with us and the realization that the act of healing yourself is also an act of healing others.

One simple way to begin on this journey is to start a daily meditation or mindfulness practice. Practicing meditation helps you become more aware of your emotions, your body, various states of consciousness and creates an opporuntity to fully experience each and every moment. Below, you will find material on how to begin.

For more information on Jessica and her Canandaigua practice, please visit – www.sacredpathwaysguidancecenter.com

If you are in need of help please call the Domestic Violence Hotlline @ (800) 799-SAFE / (800) 799-7233

Suggested Reading:

Taking Your Seat: Simple Meditation Instructions For Ordinary Peoplehttp://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-nichtern/taking-your-seat-simple-m_b_410303.html

Mindfulness Has an Edge – http://www.davidnichtern.com/huffington-post-article/mindfulness-has-an-edge/

 

 

Previous Older Entries

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.